Best careers to get into

Lämmchen

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If you were to give advice to a high school student about careers which ones would you suggest are the best ones to get into?
 

ValleyGal

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I would have to get to know the student because, you know, aptitude. If the student had an aptitude for numbers, I'd say investing or business. If they had an aptitude toward helping, I'd say nursing. If they're good with their hands and physically able, I'd say trades - electrician or plumbing pay well. If they don't like people, I'd say vet or accountant. So many variables. Whatever the aptitude, though, I'd steer them towards the ability to make enough money to support a spouse and children.

I know what I'd advise NOT to do. Don't become a social worker! It's demanding, exhausting, and doesn't pay enough! I do it for the satisfaction, but could never sustain a family as one.
 

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something in the medical field either nursing or if the person can't do blood coding
 

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If you were to give advice to a high school student about careers which ones would you suggest are the best ones to get into?
A lot would depend on what life goals the student has. If they just want to accumulate money and have the skills and willingness to work insane hours then investment banking, law, hedge funds etc would make a lot of sense. If they aren't as bothered about money and want to make a huge difference to people who have nobody else to fight for them then something like social work might be right for them. You just don't go into social work for the money, just like you don't go into investment banking if you're concerned about helping the people at the bottom.

In the middle of ranges like this, someone who is good with their hands might do well as a carpenter, electrician, plumber, mechanic etc. Unless someone is truly brilliant academically speaking I'm increasingly inclined to suggest people learn a trade - it seems there are more than enough underemployed graduates with a huge student loan and a job that didn't require a degree and doesn't pay enough to deal with the student loan, while at the same time it's increasingly difficult to find a plumber or an electrician without waiting an age.
 

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I know what I'd advise NOT to do. Don't become a social worker! It's demanding, exhausting, and doesn't pay enough! I do it for the satisfaction, but could never sustain a family as one.
I must admit I have an admiration for social workers. I loosely know a couple of younger women (both married, one with kids) who are social workers. One of them recently mentioned how her husband said she got too involved in her work, when she got home in tears because of trying to deal with a situation regarding one of the children she was working with.

It's obviously not a line of work you'd choose for the money but I can only imagine the satisfaction of reaching a point where the most broken child is finally placed into a family that cares for them.
 

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It all depends upon the interest of student and their is no one can suggest a wrong field. As per your request I suggest medical group anything either Doctor or nursing. This will be good for those who are interested in doing, other than Blockchain in computer field.
 

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If you were to give advice to a high school student about careers which ones would you suggest are the best ones to get into?

What is your passion, your heart? What inspires you? What jibes best with what seems important to you?


Because when you WANT to do something, it's not work. When you hold that what you do COUNTS, it is your ministry - and the "reward" is not the money or power or fame but the opportunity to bless.


Now, if all that matters is MONEY (and there's NEVER, EVER enough of it) .... consider crime or politics. If neither of those appeal, consider engineering or geology, or maybe business. Of course, one could chose all those (except crime, lol) because it is your calling, your ministry, how you can bless others and thus serve God (doing that AND making money are by no means mutually exclusive). When I was an undergrad, the people who had lots of job offers were the geology majors and engineering (except civil engineers - there's too many of those).




.
 

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If you were to give advice to a high school student about careers which ones would you suggest are the best ones to get into?
Well, whatever their aptitude is and the passion level, I would suggest something with the medical field. Whether it’s research, working with people, working on medical equipment, some jobs require interaction, and some are fit for loners. Some require working with your hands like specializing in medical maintenance, hazardous waste cleanup or working in administration, management, finance (billing), and clerical work. The options are limitless. The pay is all over the chart, but will have a career for a long time, even as medical technology explodes. Whether it's helping people directly, or just doing your 9 to 5.

As the population ages, there will be a need for the medical field more and more.
 

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I must admit I have an admiration for social workers. I loosely know a couple of younger women (both married, one with kids) who are social workers. One of them recently mentioned how her husband said she got too involved in her work, when she got home in tears because of trying to deal with a situation regarding one of the children she was working with.

It's obviously not a line of work you'd choose for the money but I can only imagine the satisfaction of reaching a point where the most broken child is finally placed into a family that cares for them.
Thank you, Tango, we don't usually get a whole lot of respect. Our reputation is that we just go about snatching children away from loving parents. The reality is that it's really hard to remove a child from a parent who is unsafe, because the parent really does love the child, but they have their own childhood wounds and traumas, and are unable to be safe. That's just in the family social work, though... even medical social workers, addictions, homelessness, poverty, etc social workers have many stressors. This is why I don't recommend it... in addition to not being paid enough, we also have very high-stress, demanding jobs that require the use of "self" as a tool of the trade - mental awareness and verbal clarity, the ability to think and respond quickly and with good judgement. It's hard work... so thank you for your admiration for those who do this thankless job!
 

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Interesting how none here have mentioned Christian ministry.... pastors and such. No comment, just interesting.
 

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Interesting how none here have mentioned Christian ministry.... pastors and such. No comment, just interesting.
Just saying, I'm not sure it's a chosen field, but one that needs a Call.
 

tango

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Interesting how none here have mentioned Christian ministry.... pastors and such. No comment, just interesting.
Honestly, I think anyone who wants to go into Christian ministry, other than in response to God calling them, probably isn't suited to the job.
 

tango

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Thank you, Tango, we don't usually get a whole lot of respect. Our reputation is that we just go about snatching children away from loving parents. The reality is that it's really hard to remove a child from a parent who is unsafe, because the parent really does love the child, but they have their own childhood wounds and traumas, and are unable to be safe. That's just in the family social work, though... even medical social workers, addictions, homelessness, poverty, etc social workers have many stressors. This is why I don't recommend it... in addition to not being paid enough, we also have very high-stress, demanding jobs that require the use of "self" as a tool of the trade - mental awareness and verbal clarity, the ability to think and respond quickly and with good judgement. It's hard work... so thank you for your admiration for those who do this thankless job!
What aspect of social work do you do?

I must admit that for the longest time I had an opinion much like you describe, largely formed from knowing one social worker in particular who seemed to lack the ability to accept hers wasn't the only valid opinion. But then I got to meet the social workers I mentioned earlier and, even though I only very loosely know them (even saying I "know them" sometimes feels like a bit of a stretch), it's obvious just how much they care about the kids they are working with. They deal more with finding foster and adoptive homes than with the decision to remove a child from biological parents, so I guess they don't have to get involved in determining when a struggle becomes neglect, but I still struggle to imagine spending my entire working day dealing with broken children and broken families.
 

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Honestly, I think anyone who wants to go into Christian ministry, other than in response to God calling them, probably isn't suited to the job.

I agree... but interesting, in every discussion on this topic I've ever read in Christian communities... the vocation of Christian ministry is never even brought up. What might young people consider? Why nearly everything BUT ministry? Just seems curious to me. That's all. Curious why THOSE "jobs" seem totally off the radar of Christians?


I recall several discussions among Catholic friends and relatives, noting the severe clergy shortage in the RCC. It began in the 1960s and has grown much worse every decade. LOTS of theories why.... but ONE commonly heard (especially among Catholic priests) is: It's never brought up. It USE to be that Catholic Schools discussed this vocation and encouraged boys to consider if God might be Calling them.... the story of Eli and Samuel was used often for this. First Communion classes discussed it. It USE to be highly regarded if one's son entered the priesthood. But all that has vanished; indeed, boys who even express an interest are often told "no sex, no money, no respect." During my Catholic years, NO ONE EVER mentioned (generally or to me specifically) becoming a priest. I noted a complete ABSENCE of the topic in my Lutheran parish, too. No mention - at all, ever - of that vocation. Maybe the pastor talks about it in Confirmation, I don't know. Curious. That's all, seems odd. Must be a reason. Teacher is upheld as an honorable job.... doctor/lawyer/engineer or any job that pays a lot is held in very high esteem and young people are invited to consider if that's what they should do... never Christian minister. Hum. That's all. Hum.
 

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I agree... but interesting, in every discussion on this topic I've ever read in Christian communities... the vocation of Christian ministry is never even brought up. What might young people consider? Why nearly everything BUT ministry? Just seems curious to me. That's all. Curious why THOSE "jobs" seem totally off the radar of Christians?
I suspect in the context of "the best" career paths to get into, full time ministry is at the bottom of the list on every single measure except one. Let's face it, you don't go into ministry for the money, for the status, for the admiration, for anything the secular world would regard as career success. You go into it if God clearly and unambiguously calls you into it.

I recall several discussions among Catholic friends and relatives, noting the severe clergy shortage in the RCC. It began in the 1960s and has grown much worse every decade. LOTS of theories why.... but ONE commonly heard (especially among Catholic priests) is: It's never brought up. It USE to be that Catholic Schools discussed this vocation and encouraged boys to consider if God might be Calling them.... the story of Eli and Samuel was used often for this. First Communion classes discussed it. It USE to be highly regarded if one's son entered the priesthood. But all that has vanished; indeed, boys who even express an interest are often told "no sex, no money, no respect." During my Catholic years, NO ONE EVER mentioned (generally or to me specifically) becoming a priest. I noted a complete ABSENCE of the topic in my Lutheran parish, too. No mention - at all, ever - of that vocation. Maybe the pastor talks about it in Confirmation, I don't know. Curious. That's all, seems odd. Must be a reason. Teacher is upheld as an honorable job.... doctor/lawyer/engineer or any job that pays a lot is held in very high esteem and young people are invited to consider if that's what they should do... never Christian minister. Hum. That's all. Hum.
Perhaps in the context of a Christian education it might not hurt to at least suggest that students consider the possibility of being called into full time ministry although I can't help thinking that if God is calling someone to do something specific he is quite capable of making it clear enough that the person won't need a career counselor to suggest that maybe full time ministry is something they should be considering. Personally I'd expect a suggestion that a full-time ministry might be worth exploring is the sort of thing that would be suggested in a one-on-one situation, if someone shows a particular talent and the person suggesting believes they may have a calling.

For what it's worth, my experience is that God can cause the smallest details to align in ways that leave little to no doubt when there's a specific path he wants me to follow. When details, large and small, start to come together and point the same way you don't need a career counselor to suggest the path.
 

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What aspect of social work do you do?

I must admit that for the longest time I had an opinion much like you describe, largely formed from knowing one social worker in particular who seemed to lack the ability to accept hers wasn't the only valid opinion. But then I got to meet the social workers I mentioned earlier and, even though I only very loosely know them (even saying I "know them" sometimes feels like a bit of a stretch), it's obvious just how much they care about the kids they are working with. They deal more with finding foster and adoptive homes than with the decision to remove a child from biological parents, so I guess they don't have to get involved in determining when a struggle becomes neglect, but I still struggle to imagine spending my entire working day dealing with broken children and broken families.
That is exactly what I do...work with broken children and families. My referrals come from the Ministry responsible for child welfare, so I am not in child protection at all, but I help those families find new and safer ways of relating. I teach an attachment-through-attunement psycho-educational program, and then work with those participants in individual sessions every week.

I don't recommend it for most people.
 

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Attachment through attunement? Is that the sort of thing aimed at children who have suffered trauma to help them attach to a new caregiver?
 

ValleyGal

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Attachment through attunement? Is that the sort of thing aimed at children who have suffered trauma to help them attach to a new caregiver?
Attachment through attunement is intended for the birth parents, though we have had adoptive parents come through the program as well, when the children have gone through early attachment injuries. Attunement is when a caregiver learns the cues from the child, and can anticipate and then positively respond to meet those needs in a nurturing way. This, in turn, allows the child to form a secure attachment to the safe caregiver. Forming attachments is best and easiest right after birth, but the families I work with have had attachment injuries (attachments with unsafe adults, or those who are unable or unwilling to meet their children's needs). We work with families all through early childhood through the teen years, because it's never too late to start forming healthy or healthier attachments.
 

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I suspect in the context of "the best" career paths to get into, full time ministry is at the bottom of the list on every single measure except one. Let's face it, you don't go into ministry for the money, for the status, for the admiration, for anything the secular world would regard as career success.

So the reason Christians don't even have ministry on their list is because what Christians care about is money, status, fame? If so, that's sad.

I can understand why NON-CHRISTIANS would not even consider Christian ministry at all.... but Christians?




Perhaps in the context of a Christian education it might not hurt to at least suggest that students consider the possibility of being called into full time ministry

As I understand it, over half a century ago when Catholics (at least) still considered ministry as a viable vocation (worth putting on the list of possibilities, anyway) it was often put into the context of the story of Eli and Samuel. NOT to suggest someone welcome this vocation WITHOUT being Called but rather BECAUSE he is being Called. Samuel didn't know what was happening.... Eli lead him to see the voice of God.

But yeah.... if Christian parents, Sunday School teachers, Youth workers, pastors only consider options that are abundant in money, power, fame and status - then perhaps they'd only discuss other things. And that may well be why Christian ministry just isn't on the radar anymore. And why we see a severe shortage of pastors in many denominations (including mine). Interesting, because it applies to ME, too. NO ONE EVER even brought up as a theoretical possibly being a pastor.... and I never considered that possibility. Doctor, lawyer, zillionaire businessman were usually the things promoted by parents, relatives, friends, teachers.... I think something might be amiss here. Could it be that Samuels today never "hear" a Call because it's just totally off their radar? Or maybe (worse) because Christian ministry is discouraged, frowned on, because they may lack wealth, power and fame?




.
 

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So the reason Christians don't even have ministry on their list is because what Christians care about is money, status, fame? If so, that's sad.

I can understand why NON-CHRISTIANS would not even consider Christian ministry at all.... but Christians?
From what I can gather many people in full-time ministry wouldn't recommend it as a career choice. For me it's one of many life choices that I'd look to discourage people from exploring. The ones who are sufficiently easily discouraged that they would choose something else because a couple of people said it was a long uphill road with little respite are probably the ones who would struggle and quit when they realised it was a long uphill road with little respite.

Even from a purely Christian perspective, it's not for me to suggest to a class that some of them might consider Christian ministry. I might suggest to an individual that I could see how God might be calling on them to consider such a thing but even then I wouldn't specifically recommend they do it, just that they consider whether God is calling them. If someone is brilliant at nuclear physics it makes sense to suggest they consider a career as a nuclear physicist because it's a career rather than a calling. If someone is an amazing Bible scholar it doesn't necessarily mean they will be a good pastor. If someone is very good with people and very caring it doesn't necessarily mean they will be a good pastor. If God is calling them to be a pastor it doesn't matter if they don't seem like they'd be very good at the job - just look at Moses.

As I understand it, over half a century ago when Catholics (at least) still considered ministry as a viable vocation (worth putting on the list of possibilities, anyway) it was often put into the context of the story of Eli and Samuel. NOT to suggest someone welcome this vocation WITHOUT being Called but rather BECAUSE he is being Called. Samuel didn't know what was happening.... Eli lead him to see the voice of God.

But yeah.... if Christian parents, Sunday School teachers, Youth workers, pastors only consider options that are abundant in money, power, fame and status - then perhaps they'd only discuss other things. And that may well be why Christian ministry just isn't on the radar anymore. And why we see a severe shortage of pastors in many denominations (including mine). Interesting, because it applies to ME, too. NO ONE EVER even brought up as a theoretical possibly being a pastor.... and I never considered that possibility. Doctor, lawyer, zillionaire businessman were usually the things promoted by parents, relatives, friends, teachers.... I think something might be amiss here. Could it be that Samuels today never "hear" a Call because it's just totally off their radar? Or maybe (worse) because Christian ministry is discouraged, frowned on, because they may lack wealth, power and fame?
I'd suggest the solution is to make sure people are available, and known to be available, to discuss a potential calling. I would see two potential situations that are highly undesirable here - one is people constantly thinking they are "hearing God's call" just because someone put a bug in their ear regarding what it might look like so they are endlessly looking for things that might tick boxes. The other is people hearing the call but having no idea who to talk to about it, or assuming they must be imagining it (or, worse, assuming something is wrong with them because nobody should be hearing voices).

Some time back I met with my pastor and introduced what I wanted with a line "either my imagination is in overdrive or God is calling me to do something very unusual". It certainly piqued his interest, and we talked over a number of signs that seemed to be aligning and pointing the same way for me, with a view to determining whether this really was God's leading or I'd just got an idea in my head and nothing more. There was precisely nothing he could have done ahead of time to point me in the way we concluded God was leading, all I needed from him was knowing he was available to talk things over and help me draw a conclusion. Had he been of the opinion that I would make a good pastor there's no reason why he shouldn't have asked if I could meet with him, explained what led him to his conclusion, and urged me to prayerfully consider it.

To the casual observer my pastor has a pretty easy life. He's in the church office four mornings a week and obviously in church on a Sunday morning. That's a pretty cushy number, when you're drawing a full-time salary, right? Except of course the casual observer doesn't see the amount of time he spends on things other than visibly Being At Church. Like when a church member dies and he spends time with the family, or when (like above) someone comes to him for advice regarding a possible call and he may end up meeting with them regularly for an extended period. Or the number of meetings he attends in the evenings, because church volunteers who sit on committees typically have full-time jobs. Or the times people openly express dissatisfaction with him, when he's working harder than ever. Or the fact that, as the pastor, he's the one people go to for help and support but he doesn't have any obvious people to go to when he needs help and support, and as the leader of the church he's the first into the (spiritual) battle so presumably takes the brunt of that too. My former pastor once told me that among the hardest aspects of the job was holding someone's entire life in your hands and having to pick up someone's world and put it down because today you might be with a family that is grieving the loss of a loved one, tomorrow you're with a young couple who just got engaged and want to plan their wedding, and the next day you'll be with another couple who are desperate for a child but just miscarried for the seventh time. The last thing any church needs is the kind of person who heard the idea that they might be a pastor, looks at the visible work the pastor does and figures it's an easy ride, and jumps in expecting it to be easy.
 
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