Is being normal a block to understanding things?

Jason76

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I mean, a lot of people are into conspiracy sites, but those are easily mocked/disregarded. For instance, if someone went to these sites and discussed it online - people would disregard it because it's not normal, it's not cool.

However, though, being cool seems to be some kind of conformist ignorance.

Anyway, there was this guy shouting this depopulation stuff on a math forum - before the Covid-19 madness and I found him obnoxious. However, though, things were so normal that it was difficult to believe it. Nonetheless, he was just seemed obnoxious generally - unable to relate to regular people.
 

Lazy Suesun

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“If you are different from the rest of the flock, they bite you”
Vincent O'Sullivan, The Next Room

What is normal?
 

tango

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I'm not entirely sure what you're asking here.

Sometimes conspiracy theories have a habit of turning out to be true. If I recall Alex Jones, widely regarded as a conspiracy theorist nutjob, claimed to be among the first to comment that smart TVs were listening to everything and a potential security risk. In due course it turned out that, yes, smart TVs were listening to everything and were effectively a microphone in your living room that you put there voluntarily. Of course some people think that makes Alex Jones one of the good guys, some would even call him prophetic. It actually means nothing of the sort, it just means he got something right. Other unrelated theories may or may not be right - the fact I got question 3 right on a test doesn't tell you anything about whether my answers to questions 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 etc are right.

Many times conspiracy theories are based on joining the dots, just not necessarily in the right sequence. For example, it's not exactly a secret that Bill Gates made a lot of money in the IT world and it's not exactly a secret that he donates huge sums of money to research diseases. It's less well known that the technologies within in his house include tracking pins so that, as you move about his house, you are presented with artwork and music that appeal to your tastes (I think it was one of his books in which he described this, so it's not as if it's hidden even if it's not hugely well known). Put them together and you get a scarey vaccine with microchips so he can track people. But if you take a step back you'd be forgiven for asking why he'd bother. People resist vaccines, people resist things that might track them. Except most of those people voluntarily carry a tracking device everywhere they go. They don't call it a tracking device, they call it a cellphone, but it does the same thing. And instead of needing scanning posts all over the place to track people based on RFID-enabled chips snuck into their blood, all you need is a few radio masts and GPS satellites. You know, the masts and satellites that already exist. So maybe Bill Gates is plotting some secret invasive RFID enabled things into vaccines but it doesn't take much thought to ask why he'd bother. To make it work you'd need a huge infrastructure, you'd need to tie each dose of vaccine to the exact person who received it, you'd need a huge network of scanning posts that would almost certainly need ongoing maintenance because they would be vandalised, and everything you need to make this somewhat dystopian dream come true already exists in a different form.
 
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